About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
effectively? he's so passionate about real data and real legal principles and be found as judge walker told us and chat and i refer to that decision, that if we have real data, we will always counter our foes who are trying to throw bias at the sabrett is passionate about that and that is loud be institute to be so successful in what it's done. he has the talent for tracking leading scholars from all over the country in an incredibly successful way so that over the years we have watched brad with his organizational chart and he filled in all the slots and we arrived at where we are today. so i thank you very much for the contribution he has made for us and i will turn it over to him to introduce the panel. >> thanks so much, tom. [applause] i want to start out by thanking tom. we were here at the very beginning like he said in this very room and his step with us along the way and that's really important to work here and around the country. i also want to thank matt and -- for putting together this great panel and doing all the work that gets all of us here in his room for this great commerce s
elections. as well as a growing pressure from congress as will some u.s. allies in the region against diplomacy. focus shifted to sanctions and tehran responded by further expanding its nuclear program leaving both sides worse off today than they were a few years ago. in the meantime, sanctions have held iranian middle class for the impoverished population while the regime's repression and human rights abuses have continued to intensify and its nuclear program has continued to expand. but a new window for opportunity for diplomacy has opened through obama's convincing real election, and in the next few months, up until the iranian new year, both sides enjoy maximum political space and maneuverability to negotiate effectively. the logic of diplomacy is obvious. it's the only option that can truly resolve the issue. sanctions can cripple iran's economy at the expense of destiny that pro-democracy movement there, but sanctions alone cannot resolve this issue. the military option can set back the program for a year or two but only at the expense of ensuring that eventually iran eventually
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector refo
part of the historic results of this last week where he had 20 women in the u.s. senate, and historic number and rebecca rightly reminded us that it was in part because of things like emily's list that i want to have a conversation about the kind of institutions and the organizations that have been working quiet they all this time to make this moment possible. i don't have to say something about emily's list. >> families list within washington politics, it is an incredibly powerful force. at some point they were the largest organization. i don't know if that's still true, in the day of the super pacs, they are not the largest anybody. so emily's list is an organization that supports democratic pro-choice women for all kinds of offices around the country. they are very powerful and have been working really hard for a long time to get more women effect did. other celebration about the creator of the woman, sometimes you want to say this is terrific progress in other times you say wow, 20%. but it's very, very work getting women elected. so i cited emily's list because they're the bigge
out an electoral victory. we'd like to welcome everybody who's joining us now on c-span2. if you're on c-span 1, you have to switch over. if you had a friend that didn't switch over, run over there, pound on that door. you can join us at politico.com, there's an e-mail that will come directly to us onset. we're going to bring you into the conversation. it's 10:00, the polls have closed in most of the states that will determine the outcome of this election. i would say if you wanted to step back and where do we stand at 10:00 on election night, the big headline, the one headline we know for sure, joe donnelly won the senate seat for democrats in indiana, a huge and what unexpected victory for democrats, makes it almost impossible for republicans to win back the senate. we have declared long ago that the house will stay in republican hands, it now looks like the senate will stay in democratic hands. so it's all down to the presidential race about whether or not we have a status quo, divided government in washington. the early states that have been called are very much looking in ba
blumenthal and i asked the f.d.a. commissioner to meet with us to personally meet with us after thanksgiving to discuss the steps the f.d.a. is taking to ensure the safety of energy drinks. every other week we're seeing mounting evidence that energy drinks pose safety risks. you learn about young people hospitalized or seriously hurt after consuming what are marketed as little energy pick pick-me-ups. we look forward to working with commissioner hamburg to protect our children and to protect everyone in america from these die tear supplements, whether it is 5-hour energy or the monster energy drink which led to the death of this 14-year-old girl in maryland. mr. president, it's been many years since came to this floor and argued about dietary supplements. we all know what's involved here. i always preface my remarks by saying when i got up this morning i took my vitamin, i took my fish oil pill. i believe i should have the right to do that. i don't know p it helps, but i think it does. but when it comes to dietary supplements that go beyond that type of supplement, the things that include dr
. you could use any of these terms. alexander hamilton used the term representative democracy. so we're a government that is based on majority rule and consent, but that is limited by a constitution. hence, this compound regime. now, one of the major charges that the american colonists raised against king george iii in the declaration of independence was about sovereignty. i'll read that charge. he, that's george iii, has combined with others to summit us to a jurisdiction -- to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowledged by our laws, giving his assent to their acts of pretended legislation. now, of course, the constitution he was referring to, obviously, in 1776 was the british constitution. the ancient constitution. but they were looking for some foreign jurisdiction that was going to have authority over us. we're going to examine the ideas and practices of those who in our time have combined with others to subject us or to attempt to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution. well, ideas have consequences as we learned long ago from a
and intellectual property and u.s. global awareness and cohesion, please join me in welcoming the panelists to discuss this disturbing an important report. [applause] >> thank you. >> you can sit next to me. [applause] e-mail welcome to this evening in the broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament of two things. one is how this issue of education reform has been a combination of talent that we see in this room and how it has coalesced around this issue of new technologies. that there really is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i'm a great believer that two things matter. one is ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change. it is the driver of history. this includes the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. this is one of them. so again, the fact that you are all here is the greatest. condoleezza rice and i come out of the national security background. when we were youngsters, we used to mess around with iran bomb calculator. and he used to calculate what was known as the circular err
"everything bad is good for you: how today's popular culture is actually making us smarter", he writes the great unsung story of our culture today is how many welcome trends are going up. anthony in san antonio, texas. you are on booktv with steven johnson. >> caller: good morning, mr. johnson. let me just say what a distinct pleasure it is to talk to you. i want to say in 2005, i was a counselor educator and i taught a continuing education class counselors throughout the san antonio community. believe me, i used your book, the looks were bewilderment and total aggravation. the title freak them out. learning is prefigured. the kids were teaching me. i didn't know anything about computers. how are we going to use it to guard against plagiarism? this had nothing to do with it. the resistance, as the time went on, and when i wrote my little blurb on amazon at 11 responses, only two people agreed with it. so this resistance among practitioners had to be tremendous. when the little kid wrote the iphone initiative about two or three years ago, and i played that in one of my classes, the ones
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10